biography

Cellist Bronwyn Banerdt joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in 2014.  She made her solo debut with Los Angeles Philharmonic in 2002, and has since appeared in concert throughout the United States, Europe, Russia, and southern Africa. Notable solo appearances include performances with the Houston Symphony, New West Symphony, and Symphony in C, as well as the world premiere of Poem for Cello & Orchestra by Michael Kamen with the YMF (Young Musicians Foundation) Debut Orchestra.  She has appeared at the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C., and noted composer John Rutter personally invited her to play the solo from his Requiem in Carnegie Hall.


Ms. Banerdt was awarded Grand Prize at the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Bronislaw Kaper Awards.  She has also captured top prizes at the Houston Symphony Ima Hogg Competition, Kingsville Music Competition, and the Pasadena Showcase House Competition, as well as being a two-time prizewinner at the YMF Debut Competition.


A passionate chamber musician, Ms. Banerdt is a member of the prizewinning Trio Terzetto with violinist Diana Cohen and pianist Andrius Zlabys. She frequently collaborates with renowned artists such as Kim Kashkashian, Ida Kavafian, Charles Neidich, and members of the Emerson, Guarneri, Juilliard, Borodin, and Orion string quartets. She has performed at numerous chamber music festivals including Marlboro Music and Music from Angel Fire and plays regularly with the Jupiter Chamber Players in New York City. Ms. Banerdt is a frequent substitute with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, and the Lyric Opera of Chicago.


A native of Los Angeles, Ms. Banerdt earned her Bachelor’s Degree at age 19 from the USC Thornton School of Music, where she studied with Ronald Leonard. She subsequently studied at The Curtis Institute of Music under the tutelage of David Soyer and received her Master’s Degree from The Juilliard School with Richard Aaron.


Ms. Banerdt plays a Montagnana model cello made by Mario Miralles in 1998.

Photo by Gary Adams